Addiction and Codependency

Pia Mellody joins the company of those who have created highly effective therapeutic models and who can put their theories into practice with unusual skill. Pia’s approach is phenomenological, resulting from her own painful struggle with codependency, as well as from thousands of hours spent interviewing and working out healing strategies with patients at The Meadows.

Pia began her unique journey as the head of nursing at The Meadows.

In her early days, she suffered from low self-esteem, unhealthy shame, and a hyper-vigilance that accompanied her need to be perfect in every aspect of her work and life. She lived in that lonely place of non-intimacy, polarization and silent anger that most codependents experience.

Pia decided to get some help for her problems at another treatment facility, where she found the experience not only frustrating, but ineffective. Her problems did not seem to fit into any consistent category of the Diagnostic Manual. When she completed treatment, she continued to try to make sense of her raw pain and confusion, reaching out to others to try to get assistance in alleviating the distress. She was grappling with an inner distress exacerbated by a sense of defectiveness, the inability to engage in really good self-care, and living in reaction to other people. Thanks greatly to her, this condition is now called “codependence.” At that time, there was no coherent theory or therapy for the problem.

Pia Mellody believed that alcohol and drug addiction, sex addiction, gambling addiction and eating disorders must be treated before the core underlying codependency can be treated.

Understanding that addiction is rooted in codependence is another contribution that Pia helped to clarify. Years ago, Dr. Tibot, an expert on alcoholism, saw that there was an emotional core to alcoholism that he called the “disease of the disease.” Pia’s work has certainly corroborated that intuitive insight.

Pia Mellody’s most important contribution may be how she and her groups of suffering codependents worked out strategies of healing. They did this through trial and error. The results were so striking that The Meadows encouraged Pia to develop a workshop titled “Permission to be Precious.” It was an instant success, and Pia began to take it to different cities around the U.S. Soon she wrote a book, Facing Codependence, with Andrea Wells Miller and J. Keith Miller. Later she developed a powerful approach to treating love addicts and their counterparts’ avoidant addictions.

Her most recent book, The Intimacy Factor, is the only relationship book that treats the core “grief feeling work” around early abuse, neglect and abandonment. I believe that other self-help relationship books fail because they do not address these fundamental issues. “Feeling work” involves exposure, vulnerability and what Carl Jung called “legitimate suffering.” Pia has done her share of that and has the know-how to gently nurture others through this work.

Pia’s work has become the core model in treating addictions of all kinds and the core of codependence they rest upon. She has personally led hundreds, probably thousands, of people suffering from codependency into recovery and wholeness.

Pia answered Dr. Timmon Cermak’s challenge to do the work that established codependency as a treatment issue. She not only found a consistent way to conceptualize this source of suffering, but she found the know-how to address it.

The time has come for a broader recognition of Pia’s art and genius.

Pia Mellody
2018-04-30T21:13:26+00:00

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